History Matters Ideas and Culture (HIST 115.3)

Recent/Current Offerings

Syllabus / Public content Section Term Instructor
HIST 115 02 January 2017 Angela Kalinowski (primary instructor)
HIST 115 04 January 2017 Mark Meyers (primary instructor)
HIST 115 S02 January 2017 Angela Kalinowski (primary instructor)
HIST 115 S04 January 2017 Angela Kalinowski (primary instructor)
HIST 115 S06 January 2017 Angela Kalinowski (primary instructor)
HIST 115 S08 January 2017 Angela Kalinowski (primary instructor)
HIST 115 S10 January 2017 Angela Kalinowski (primary instructor)
HIST 115 S12 January 2017 Angela Kalinowski (primary instructor)
HIST 115 S14 January 2017 Mark Meyers (primary instructor)
HIST 115 S18 January 2017 Mark Meyers (primary instructor)
HIST 115 S20 January 2017 Mark Meyers (primary instructor)
HIST 115 S26 January 2017 Angela Kalinowski (primary instructor)
 
HIST 115 01 September 2016 Maurice Jr Labelle (primary instructor)
HIST 115 61 September 2016 Daniel Price (primary instructor)
HIST 115 S07 September 2016 Maurice Jr Labelle (primary instructor)
HIST 115 S09 September 2016 Maurice Jr Labelle (primary instructor)
HIST 115 S11 September 2016 Maurice Jr Labelle (primary instructor)
HIST 115 S13 September 2016 Maurice Jr Labelle (primary instructor)
HIST 115 S15 September 2016 Maurice Jr Labelle (primary instructor)
HIST 115 S17 September 2016 Maurice Jr Labelle (primary instructor)
HIST 115 S61 September 2016
HIST 115 S65 September 2016
HIST 115 S67 September 2016
HIST 115 S69 September 2016
HIST 115 S73 September 2016
HIST 115 S77 September 2016
 
HIST 115 96 January 2016 Clay Burlingham (primary instructor)

Description

Courses in this series examine how history has shaped?and been shaped by?human thought and culture. They might examine how the ideas of intellectuals, philosophers, writers, artists, or religious thinkers related to historical developments such as the spread of Christianity or Islam; the rise of modern secularism; or the various revolutionary movements of the modern world, whether political, economic, social, or artistic. They might examine elite, middle-brow, or popular culture for clues about how past societies responded to the realities of being human ? birth, illness, death, the need to work, prepare food, raise children, establish communities, or make sense of one?s place in the universe. Examples of courses: ?An Introduction to Modern European Thought and Culture,? ?Religious Reformations of the 16th Century,? ?A Global History of Food and Eating.? All courses emphasize how historians have understood the relationship between ideas, culture, and historical change.

Attention

A maximum of nine credit units of 100-level HIST may be taken for credit. Only six of these credit units may count toward a History major or minor. The remaining three credit units will count as a junior elective in Requirement 7.

Note

To see which specific topic(s) will be offered each term, click on the CRN for each lecture in the Class Search to see the specific description for that class.

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